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Greatest Hobby in the World!
Doug B, Minnesota USA

I have been an active metal detector enthusiast since 1979 and have used every brand of machine that has been made. BFO, TR, VLF, Pulse and others. For the majority of that time I was convinced that I was using the "best" brand available. In July of 2001 I decided to invest in a machine that would be primarily used in the water. I've been a scuba diver since 1981 and my most valuable discoveries had been found in the water. After much research and actually speaking with other detector owners I purchased the Minelab Excalibur 1000. Since that time I have recovered 486 rings and literally thousands of coins. Many are pre-1900. The best ring found was a 1/3 carat VVS1 Diamond Solitaire in 14K. That was a sweet surprise for my lovely wife! My favorite coin recovery would have to be the 1854-O Half Dime in EF-40 condition. Not really that valuable but a wonderful looking Seated Variety coin.

My friends all have hobbies like golfing, fishing and hunting. That's fine, but my hobby is the "Greatest Hobby in the World!" I leave home broke and come back with diamonds, gold, silver and some pocket change! Get yourself a Minelab Excalibur and find out what I'm excited about.

There is WEALTH in the WATER!

Old Colonial Site Reveals Lost Treasure
Robert G., New York, USA

I was out detecting with my Minelab Explorer in the woods beside an old colonial road in NY. Nearby, I had come across two homes listed on a map from the colonial era and was pulling old state coppers and artifacts from the swampy ground near and old stream. I figured that the map showed three more structures 1/2 mile down the path, I might be able to pull up some more goodies. Well, there was plenty of trash along the way and as the path wandered back and forth between the stream and the road, I got a strong signal. Digging around 4" into the earth popped a pendant, pin back up.

I thought it was going to be junk jewelry at first because of the trash concentration, however, upon further examination it appeared to have a 10k stamp next to the pin which was still intact. 10k I thought, not a bad start for the day. Then I turned it over, wiped some of the dirt away and saw an eagle below a class year of "69" with an "A" shaped background with the initials U.S.M.A. on it. United States Military Academy, that's West Point, I thought. West Point was about 20 miles north of this site. I had found a West Point Class A pin.

After detecting the rest of the day, finding nothing more than chopped lead, I decided to see if I could locate its owner. I called West Point to see if the initials "HJ" could be traced to a cadet graduating in 1969. They thanked me for trying to locate its owner and informed me that the "HJ" was the manufacturer of the piece. But, they sent out a letter via email to all the class indicating that a pin was found and gave my contact email address for correspondence. I received several messages from that class, many thanking me for trying to locate its owner and only one saying that it might be his. After several communications, it turned out not to be his (lost his in VA) and the search continues. The 35th class re-union was this week and an announcement was made of the find. I still am hopeful of finding its owner.

Thank you,
Robert G.

Walking Liberty Bracelet with Mercury Dimes Found!
Bernie W., West Virginia, USA

I had gotten a Minelab Explorer for Christmas and was just beginning to learn the machine when I took it out for a day of hunting. It was different from the Minelab Sovereign that I had for a couple of years.

It was a rare and fairly warm winder day when a friend, Mikey, and decided to go detecting at one of our favorite spots to hunt. I had taken his advice about listening repeatedly to air tests of coins and that advice came in handy that day. I was out hunting along side of him when I got a rather large target and figured it was another crushed soda can, but the tone just sounded too good, so I decided to dig. Since I was still getting used to pin pointing with the Explorer, I was cutting a larger plug than usual, but it turned out to be worth it. When I lifted out the plug I saw a half of a silver bracelet and the other half was still in the hole. It was a bracelet made from a walking liberty half dollar and two mercury dimes. It was a very exciting time for sure! This was the first walking liberty I had ever found and by far the nicest find that I had ever made. I immediately showed Mikey and then we spent the next 15 minutes just looking at it.

My next finds that day were a small silver Cub Scout ring, a silver rosie and a silver Washington quarter, all in a row. Wow, what a day I had that day for sure! A local jeweler has taken a look at the bracelet and is now repairing the break that had happened when a mower hit it before I found it.

 

Thirty Two Ounces of Gold with the GP3000
Julie H, Australia

This year we had our first trip to Western Australia. We had in mind to find a patch with some large nuggets. Both my husband Michael and I own GP3000's and have been pleased with their performance after owning the SD2000's and SD2100's. We started off in the flogged places and around diggings and could not believe our success. The trouble was we never got to go walking much because we could not walk away from gold even though the pieces were small. We met so many people who were disappointed this year after having success other years and they were really surprised when we told them we had found 1541 pieces giving us a total of thirty two ounces.

Yours faithfully, Julie

The Quattro Finds A Valuable Penny!
Andy Sabisch, USA

I had located a few sites near my home town where one-room school houses had stood in the early 1900's and had gotten permission to hunt several of the sites. One was now choked with newer pine trees and dense underbrush; however, after finding a 1926 Mercury dime on my second sweep, I knew the area had potential. The targets were deep - at least 7" or more - and the ground was mineralized clay common in this part of the Carolinas but the Quattro was doing quite well ferreting out coins and a few other trinkets. After a few hours I headed home with 34 wheat cents, 4 silver dimes and a few things such as Cracker Jack prizes and a well-worn watch fob. As usual for this area the wheats usually come out totally grungy so after checking for the infamous 1931S and 1909S VDB (of course they were noticeably absent), I proceeded to clean the rest of the stuff I'd found over the last week or so.

When I was done I went through the coins to see if I had any filler dates for the few remaining holes in my Whitman folders (actually on my 3rd set of Lincoln cents). Well, one was a 1922 but there was no 1922 hole in the book... only a 1922D. Pulled by Whitman pricing guide and what I found was that there were no pennies minted in Philadelphia in 1922 - only in Denver. It appears that there were some minted where the "D" on the die was filled up with debris and the mint mark was not struck on the coins.

The value according to PCGS... it ranged from $400 in Good condition to $25,000+ in MS condition! Considering it was circulated and the ground did take a toll on the surface, it will probably appraise in the $500 to $800 range which is tough to beat for a penny!

The Quattro worked flawlessly at the site and had no problem detecting the coin at close to 9 inches. Not bad for a true "turn-on-and-go" detector!

Trust in Minelab Technology
Hamis M., Chunya

 I purchased my first metal detector in 2002 and it was XT18000 from Minelab.  I saw my friends at Kiwanja village who were doing very fine financially due to their use of Minelab detectors. This attracted me to buy my own machine.  All in all my trust is currently with Minelab detectors and I have five GP3000, ten SD 2200V2, one SD2200D and one XT18000.  The largest piece of gold that I recovered weighed 1800 grams and I recovered it in 2002 in Sangambi area in Chunya district.  I am one of the richest people in Chunya district. I have benefited a lot from Minelab detectors and I am one of the luckiest people as far as gold hunting is concerned.  GP3000 is the best!

Golden Coins from the World's Fair
Tommy C., Louisiana, USA

I live in Louisiana and like to hunt in New Orleans where the 1884 World's Fair was held. While hunting in the park is very tough, if you go slow you can find some pretty nice stuff.

On the way to the park I told my dad I was going to dig any target that had an ID of a 1, 2, or 3 because of the recent information I learned from the forum about where gold coins ID'd. My dad and I started hunting around a nice old Live Oak that day in the back of the park and we found a few Indian Cents and even some civil war relics (Confederate soldiers camped there for a long time). The signals were few because over the past year we have been digging there a lot and have removed just about everything that read close to a coin.

After about 10 or 15 pieces of aluminum and nothing to show for it, I heard a soft signal that showed about 5" deep and read a 3 on the digital meter. I cut a nice plug out and when I flipped the plug over I could see the first $1.00 coin. I pulled it out of the plug and ran to dad to show him. After all the excitement I walked back to the hole and checked it for anything else and what do you think I heard? Another signal! I reached in the hole and removed some dirt and there staring me in the face was another beautiful $1.00 gold coin. The dates were 1854 and 1855 and they were in great shape. This is proof that it is very hard to clean out an area unless you are digging everything.

A Golden Souvenir from England
Gary B., Texas USA

I was on day 11 of a 14 day detecting vacation in Colchester, England. I was with a group of 5 friends and already a 1500 BC Bronze Age Axe hoard was found, a hoard of 3 gold starters, 1 single axe head, and some nice hammered silver. I was afraid I was going to get skunked on finding something special. I was using the Explorer II at a field we'd be on three separate times. My friend Shawn had a feeling about this field, and he was right. I was in a corner of the field with few targets being found when I got a signal and dug a plug. At first I thought it was a button until I picked it up and realized it was a gold coin. Of course no one was in ear shot and had to enjoy the moment by myself. This is the only picture I have of the coin (it's still in England awaiting an export license.) It's officially classified as a "Gallo_Belgic E Stater, C. 56BC class 2 of the type.

Trashy Ground Reveals Another Treasure
Calvin M., Virginia USA

I found this coin in an area that I have been passing up on hunting because of the trash and it's location close to an old metal shed. I finally decided to try it after hunting areas I have already hunted several times and this was the third thing I dug, so I called it a day. The next day the farmer planted the field so I can't hit it again for a while. I have found coins from the 1500's, 1600's, 1800's, 1900's and 2000's in this field, but no 1700's. Well now I have one!

 

I always wanted a Kilo
By Queensland Sandy

My mate and I have been detecting ten years plus and we take it fairly seriously, getting away every chance we get. I don’t show off the nuggets I get, but a few good friends get to see them. I’ve been reasonably successful over the years and have had my share of 3 and 5 ounce pieces but just recently one of my friends teased me that I’d never jagged a kilo.

Now my mate and I have owned a good few Minelab detectors but we recently bought the new GP 3000, now let me tell you, that’s a bonza machine. Runs really quiet and you can hear those faint little whispers.

We decided to detect a spot that I recon every detector in Queensland has been over, and ours included, but I had a new big coil and I thought that the big coil and the GP together might be just what was needed.

The morning was spent detecting and all we got was one small piece along with a few bullets. Stopped for lunch then try a spot just to the side of the main workings. After a while, I got a very faint signal that sounded just like another bullet. I dig away for a while then my mate comes over to lend a hand. We were in hard clay and gravel, the pick near bounced back at you so we took turns digging and pinpointing. As it happens, our pinpointing wasn’t spot on with the big coil and we hit it with the pick,- ouch! one gouge. We finally unearthed it and I measured the depth at one hand spread less than the length of my pick, about 22 inches.

Well I’d found my kilo piece. Final weight is 1520 grams and a pretty specimen at that.

Minelab Delivers
Said M., Chunya 

I purchased my first metal detector in 1999.  It was not a Minelab detector and results of this machine was not so impressive and hence made me look for a more powerful machine and that was Minelab XT18000 and I purchased it in 2000.  I am aware of several companies that produce metal detectors but I never bought any machine from them since my friends who has such machines never recovered the money they paid for such machines. They are simply ineffective.  I now have six GP3000, five SD2200V2, three SD2200D, four XT18000 and two SD2100V2.  The largest piece of gold that I recovered weighed 1860 grams of gold in 2001 in Matundasi area in Chunya district.  GP3000 is the best since it discovers even less than 0.2 grams of gold at depth.  However, the SD2200D is the second best. 

Western Australia Gold Finds

Who knows what you’ll find detecting?
Stan V., Australia

  

Last year and again this year, Stan V. won the Detectorist of the Year award from the Brisbane Detector Club. He is very methodical and passionate about his detecting, enjoying the hobby for over 15 years. Stan has located an old army hospital site from WW2, now part of a dairy farm, south of Brisbane. The hospital site covers 12-15 acres and Stan uses a spray of paint on the trees every 5-6 meters so he can keep track of where he has detected.

The Sovereign has been a terrific machine for him finding literally thousands and thousands of coins, badges, rings and other artifacts.

One of his most exciting finds has been two US Army dog-tags. Stan has even been able to locate one of the owners and returned the dog tag to him 62 years later.

Bob L. was posted to Australia as part of the US Army Red Arrow division. For part of that time Bob was stationed at the US Army hospital site that Stan has recently been detecting. Through lengthy investigation on the internet and through American contacts, Stan was finally able to get in contact with Bob who is now 83, returning the lost dog-tag and picking up an appreciative pen-pal in the process. In addition to this Stan has now found another dog-tag and is again trying to trace its owner a captain in charge of the medical division.

Stan enjoys the fun of detecting and is still excited by all the various memorabilia that he locates, cleans and catalogues. To vary things he also detects the Gold Coast beaches and does really well with rings and other jewelry. He is now looking at moving up into one of the more modern coin and relic detectors to see what deeper targets he can find.

 

 

 

 

Detecting the North
Paul H., Australia

I have used 3 Minelab Detectors for coin detecting and all are top detectors.

Excalibur

First detector was an Excalibur submersible. It was always in the back of my vehicle but never much used. That was until I was in Port Headland, WA and I wasn’t having any luck picking up a job. I was down to my last $50 and no dole. I saw a small side show on part of an oval and started thinking about money they might drop around the stalls.

Two days later they were gone and I was there Excalibur in hand. I had a smile on my face from that day on $40 for 4 hours. My first time, trying to learn as I go.

From that day on the days just got better. For six weeks I detected 2 beaches, 5 sports grounds, 2 parks and 2 race tracks between Port Headland and Karratha. I found a total of just over $3,000 in $1 and $2 coins, 17 rings, 22 pendants and 20 odd dollars of 1 and 2 cent pieces. Approximately $50 in silver, mostly 50c pieces (once I got the hang of the discriminator). Plus 34 pre-decimal coins, lead sinkers - I stopped counting at 150.

For six weeks I was completely in awe with what I was finding so easily I didn’t even give a thought to getting a job. I had the best time. My fuel, food, scotch coke & ice cost me nothing.

I drove home to Kal along the way and I made 2 stops which got me another $60. I arrived in Kal with over $300 left and all the other goodies, it was an amazing trip.

My thoughts on this machine… nothing to fault except it’s bloody heavy and needs to be hip-mounted. It would then have minimal drag in the water and be extra light on land and beach. To me it’s my multipurpose detector. You can detect with this, rain, hail or shine. You can drop it in the sand, water or mud. It should be re-birthed as the all terrain.

Sovereign XS-2a Pro

I had a great time with this machine. I was only going to buy a second-hand Excalibur in case my other one broke. But I ended buying a new Sov. XS-2a Pro for $950.

I was working in Tom Price when I bought this. Three nights at two to three hours a night after work got me $62 in $2 and $1 coins. A bit later I had 2 weeks R&R and drove up to my old Excalibur grounds between Port Headland. I had 13 days off with pay (you beauty!).

Well within 12 days I had found enough gold coins to pay for the detector. Thirteen days of detecting with the XS-2a Pro got me over $1,000 in gold coins in the same areas which I’d already been over with the Excalibur. My best with this detector is $403 in six hours. Detecting a grassed area near a swimming pool I would have got more but my ears were ringing after six hours so I walked away.

I have detected Esperance in 3 places for another $600 + dollars and more rings and pre-decimal coins. A place called Bridgetown got me another $80.

A top machine. $2 coins have a distinct sound and as with the Excalibur, minimal trash.

Sovereign Elite

This to me is much the same as the XS2a Pro except it has a few extras. Sometimes I think I may be getting a tad more depth with the Sovereign Elite. I haven’t used this as much as the XS-2a, which I traded in on the Elite but it’s doing extremely well.

I detected 2 different swimming pools for a total of $560 dollars. 3 race tracks for $223 and 2 spots on the same ground as the XS-2a Pro for $94. In Whim Creek I found $20 on the pub lawn and 9 pre-decimal coins from 1880 to 1920.

I’ve stopped counting the coins now. I just love the hobby/ lifestyle. I know I can go traveling, fishing, detecting and it’s not going to cost me a red cent. It doesn’t get any better than that but then again who knows what riches you will find. There are bucket loads out there.

The reason I was skeptical about giving up my experience was the concern of people who follow not doing the right thing. I do not dig holes on grassed areas. I use a screwdriver and prod for the coin. Once pin-pointed there’s no need to dig holes and if you do, you’ll stuff it up for me and everybody else.

I could rabbit on for hours about the things I learnt about these machines the amount of coins still amazes me. There are bucket loads of them out there old and new. Research in local libraries led me to a lot of old coins and finding coins over 100 years old is the biggest buzz of detecting for me.

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Minelab Strikes it Lucky in Ghana

Our team in Ghana has been working hard and traveling extensively as part of their awareness and education strategy to inform small-scale miners of the benefits to be gained through Minelab technology.  Its important that we acknowledge the support of the Small-Scale Miners Association who have been great facilitators in our trips and we are very proud to show Kwesi Baiden - product trainer (pictured here) with a sample of his finds during a product demonstration in Takoradi.  We also thank Peace Mining for their hospitality and for the opportunity to show what Minelab products can do!!

 

MY FIRST NUGGET & A 40 GRAMMER!

I have owned my GP EXTREME for approximately eighteen months and admittedly it hasn’t been used to the extent that it should have been. I was having little success, when a friend came up with the idea of going to the Golden Triangle in Victoria.

A number of days went past and Norm was finding 1, 2 and 3 gram pieces every day and I had not found one piece, damn discouraging, but I kept at it.

We were then given a ‘tip’ of a likely spot to try. I set up the machine and headed off into what I think must have been the biggest, widest and longest rubbish dump in the district. After digging up half a ton of rubbish, I was ready to head back to the car. “I will head towards that tree over there and then knock off” I said to myself. A few minutes later another signal, “more rubbish” I’m thinking. I start to dig the hole and a clump of clay came away from my pick. It was weighty, so I broke it in half and I was looking at what was my first significant find with a detector. My maiden nugget. When it was washed under the tap, back at the caravan park, 40.3 grams of pure gold my first nugget.

I still sit and look in wonder at my nugget, asking how many people detected the nugget and continued to walk on thinking that it was more rubbish, leaving the 40 grammer for me. I have to say, dig every signal, because if you don’t I will, and I might find a mate for my 40 grammer.

What’s your preferred transport?

 Here in Australia, most of us are used to jumping into our 4WD or car to get out to the goldfields. A few of us may use a motorbike to get off the beaten track, but ever thought of having a trusty donkey?

Our friends in Brazil will use any method at hand to get up into the mountains, not that I blame them with nuggets like these to be found.

You’ll find a Minelab detector almost everywhere

If you think detecting in the Australian bush on a hot day, with flies buzzing around and rusty tin cans to dig up is daunting - think of these US soldiers in Afghanistan with their Minelab F3 mine clearance detectors.

These are not staged shots but photos from the front line, here it really counts. It is for these reasons that the Minelab F1A4 and F3 are the preferred detectors when it really counts.

 

I have been metal detecting for almost 30 years and I have owned a Minelab detector for over two years. Six months ago I upgraded from an Explorer XS to the Explorer II and I am just writing to congratulate you on such a brilliant machine. I never cease to find more ways to configure and operate my machine to suit my particular needs.

I live in an area where other detectors just simply will not work due to the ground effect but the Explorer II just tunes it out. I thought my XS was the best machine ever but upgrading to the Explorer II has prompted me to put pen to paper, (or should I say fingers to keyboard), and pat you on the back. It is hard to know what you can do to improve on this brilliant machine.

Congratulations Minelab, a big pat on the back.

Martin S., Isle of Mull Scotland

I was out metal detecting where I have detected before and I was trying out the iron mask to see how it worked. The place I went to I found several silver mercury dimes and silver quarter and sterling silver fork. Needless to say it been gone over really good. With the iron mask I got a single beep that sounded like a coin. When I cut the hole and turned over the sod I found a 1913 Canadian stuck to the bottom of the sod. When I put the coin away and looked down in the hole I saw more coins sticking out of the dirt. The next coin I pulled out was a 1910 Canadian quarter, 1906 v nickel.

After all that I put the probe in the hole to check to the see if there is anything else down there and it beeped telling me there were more coins in the hole. Digging out more dirt showed a 1902 barber quarter, 1916 v nickel and 1905 v nickel. Still the hole was making sound. I dug into the loose dirt again coming out with 1909 wheat penny, 1880 seated liberty dime and the next scoop of dirt brought out an 1888 v nickel and 1916-s mercury dime. That was ten old coins out of one hole. Oddly enough this was the second lot of ten coins I found in one hole.

Jeff E., North Dakota USA

Going for the Deep Ones!
Ron C., Washington USA

While on vacation in California I went to Pismo beach on the first day of detecting I found 2 pull tabs and 2 coins it was pretty clean and seemed liked you could always see somebody with a metal detector. So on the second day I decided to take my Sovereign XS with the Wot coil and hunt from the wet sand too the sea wall and at between 12 - 14 in I found this diamond ring with 25 diamonds thanks Minelab for one deep seeking detector Happy hunting.

 

 

Minelab Musketeer Pays for itself in 20 minutes!
Eric, Florida USA

About one week ago, after much deliberation, I moved up to a Minelab Musketeer Advantage. I got home at 4PM, read the directions and assembled this machine in about 30 minutes. With two hours of light remaining, I went to an old church, which was about 100 years old. The Pastor's son was a friend of mine so I had exclusive rights to the property. I began to search around an old tree where a swing had hung for over 75 years. In a matter of minutes I heard a strong signal. I began to dig and found a porcelain canister with a glass top. The glass was green but there was one item inside, an 1878cc Morgan that looked like it was made yesterday. In the last week I have found Barbers of all denominations including a dime at 14" !!!!!!! as well as several standing and walking liberty quarters. There have been a few Indian heads but that's about it. I had checked this place out a bunch of times; but until I took the Musketeer Advantage to it, I never knew it's potential.

Thanks!!!!

 

 

 

 

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Battle of Thames Find
Rick D.

I found this U.S. First Regiment of Artillery War of 1812 button while detecting at a Loyalist home site on the shore of Lake Erie near where Harrison's men were supposed to have landed on their way to the Battle of the Thames with the British.

 


The Eureka Gold is a Great Detector

We took a 3 day trip to an old mining area in Oregon. I've found several nuggets there in the past. While we were all detecting, Jack started yelling "I FOUND A NUGGET!" The nugget weighed 1.5 dwt. We were all excited. My son  and I had to leave the next day. Just after I got home, Jack and Bob called... Jack found a bigger nugget! It weighed 3.5 dwt. He wanted to thank Minelab for a fantastic detector. We took pictures of him and the gold, the two nuggets weighed 7.4 grams (4.6 dwt). These were his first nuggets with a metal detector.
The new Eureka Gold is a definite improvement over the XT18000. The two tracking speeds work great and the iron discriminator goes blank on metal. What a great detector.   Thanks Minelab! Mark & Jack

 


The Eureka Gold is so easy to use

The Eureka Gold is the best and easiest to use VLF detector on the market today.  The Accu-Trak ground balancing handles even the worst ground conditions enabling me to find nuggets as small as (.1grain ) 1/10th of a grain with ease!

 


Excalibur does it again!

I am a Minelab customer since OCT 96 : first with a Sovereign then the Excalibur. They help me find more than 300 gold rings.  I love BBS technology because it saves time and energy : the outstanding discrimination enables me to tell by the sound (after a a very little learning curve) if the target is worth digging or not. You can even tell WHICH coin it is, or if it is GOLD (very low and solid tone).

 


A Closer Look at Minelab's Excalibur

I have used an Excalibur since it first became available on the local markets, so I write from experience here.  I have used these detectors on wet beach sands, in driving rain, wading in shallow water and scuba diving.

This versatile detector from Minelab owes me nothing, in fact I'm way in front. My most valuable three finds to date are a 50-gram platinum necklace, a half Sovereign that had been made into a ring and a half carat 50 point wedding ring. The diamond ring I found on my second trip out with the Excalibur.

Oh yes, it has given me much in the way of satisfaction, exhilaration and edge of the seat anticipation too!  You just don't know what the next signal will bring.  The Excalibur is a very compact unit dive mode, and under the water really does seem to become an extension of your arm. A target, when located is just under and in front of you, no need to reach or swim forward. The unit in non-buoyant and will, if released merely it flat on the bottom - no fighting to keep it down of close the the bottom - wonderful.


A Hoard of Golden Coins Found with the Explorer!
John K., Nottinghamshire, UK

Edward III Gold Noble!

The Nottinghamshire Detecting and Recovery Team (John, Dave & Kev) were off to new field tomorrow and the forecast was foggy. Perfect! As usual, we were checking in on our on-line detecting club (www.minelabowners.com). This is an Internet based club, which we use as part of our hobby. I checked an old maps link and found an 1860`s map of the area that we were intending to search the next day and noticed a strangely shaped field boundary. This was mentally noted and thought no more of it.

We arrived at the site the next morning in thick fog, icy roads and the field was frozen solid. I tested the ground with my spade to see if it was possible to dig and to my relief, it was only frozen for 2 or 3 inches deep. Fortunately for us, we agreed to go ahead with the search. After a couple of hours of finding the usual shotgun cartridges and pieces of lead etc, we arrived at a hedgerow and switched our machines off. We were ready for a welcome break from the elements. Dave produced his finds so far, a very poor selection, and sarcastically asked if we would find anything good today! I responded with optimism, saying that you have to believe that there are still worthwhile finds to be made. Suddenly, the memory of the odd shaped field appeared in my head and we quickly decided to head straight for that area. Within a few minutes, I got a definite signal from my Explorer, which showed a coin was likely. After several minutes of frantic digging, the biggest hammered coin I'd ever seen appeared. I realized it must be a Groat!! Within another few minutes, two more had surfaced and suddenly I didn't feel cold anymore. Then, to my amazement, my Explorer registered a gold target. After moving the first load of frozen earth, the signal got ever stronger, and a shiny yellow metal object caught my eye. At first glance I thought, "Damn, all that hard work for a bottle top?"

How wrong I was! Closer inspection of the crumpled object revealed a king standing on a ship, holding a sword and shield. I had found a gold hammered coin. I quickly realized that this was no ordinary group of coins and thoughts of a hoard began to spring to mind. Being the generous type, I shouted the others over and showed them the 4 coins and suggested that they have a go as I had been so fortunate. To our absolute amazement, Dave switched his Explorer on and a gold target was immediately registered under his coil. A second gold hammered coin was recovered, which was in mint condition. Kev's Sovereign yielded yet another one. By the end of the morning, the three of us had recovered 7 gold Nobles, Edward III and Richard II, plus approximately 3 dozen Groats, a couple of Half-Groats and a few Pennies. This could only be a scattered hoard as the majority of the coins were in very good condition, and they were all found in a relatively small area. It wasn't a bad day after all!!


Civil War Infantry Button Found
Rick F., Tennessee USA

My brother-in-law and I were detecting at the Wilson County, TN fairgrounds. We had previously detected in the fairgrounds with several other detectorists from the forums that we had gotten together with, but on the prior trip we had only found clads and a few wheaties.

On this trip, I was detecting along an old sidewalk that was made with reinforced concrete. I was using the Explorer XS set in IM -12 with a Minelab 8" coil. I had to go slowly because of the masking from the rebar in the walk. At the corner of the walkway about 8-10" from the edge of the walk, I got a strong signal in the penny range on the Smartscreen. When I dug down, I recovered a Block "I" button, with a plain back, at a depth of 6-8". Not wanting to be disappointed, I didn't think that it could be a real Civil War infantry button without a backmark.

After doing some research on the net, I found that there were many Confederate buttons that were not backmarked for fear of reprisal because the companies were doing business with both sides. I posted the find on the Relic Forum and was pleased to get several very positive responses, indicating that I had indeed found the real thing.

As it turns out, the town of Lebanon and the location of the fairgrounds was a crossroads of Civil War activity.


Multiple Coins from a Colonial Settlement
Tim G., Pennsylvania USA

I was detecting an early settlement on a brisk day in April with my Minelab Explorer. I found 5 colonial copper coins and some pewter buttons during the day, no small feat for my area. But the coin that made my heart palpitate was the 1811 Half Dollar I pulled out of the cold, muddy ground at 10 and 1/2 inches. I was amazed it was in such mint condition, not a hint of wear. All of the coins I was finding were 8 to 11 inches down and the Explorer pinpointed dead-on, even that deep. I can't wait to get out again!

 

 

 


Storm Finds
Steve P. - New Hampshire, USA

Rubies and Diamonds!We had a coastal storm earlier in the week which I knew from past experience always creates a good chance for some nice finds at our New England beaches. So when the weekend came around I was anxious to head out to one of my favorite beaches and see what the storm had done to the beach.

As soon as I came over the dune onto the beach I knew it was going to be a good day as I could see that the storm had cut several feet of sand off of the beach. I headed down to a spot where there was a 2 foot high drop off and fired up my Explorer XS and set it in iron mask mode at -8, just high enough to cut off most of the lobster trap wire that gets washed up on our beaches after every winter storm.

It wasn’t long before I came to my first signal which was up towards the top right corner of the smart find display but a bit lower than most coins show up. A few scoops with the sand scoop brought up a silver horse shoe pin. Well that is a lucky sign I thought to myself as I started looking for my next target. A few feet later brought another signal not too far off from the first and I quickly uncovered a silver cross. It looks like it had some stones set in it but judging from the tarnish in the settings they had washed out long ago.

After digging a few pull tabs I got a signal that sounded like gold to me and it was right down on the bottom of the smart find about 2/3rd of the way over to the right. I knew it was either a ring or the tab part of a pull tab with the pull part broken off. In a few moments I had the target in the basket of my scoop and was shaking the sand out of it when the glint of gold caught my eye – I had a 18K wedding band.

As I was kicking the sand back into the hole I got another good sounding signal as I waved my Explorer around without even paying attention to it. It was only 2 feet away from where I had just dug the gold ring and this signal sounded exactly the same. The depth indicator showed it was only 3 or 4 inches under the surface and I got it out with the first scoop. And more gold flashed as I shook the sand out of the scoop. My eyes really lit up when I saw the sparkle of diamonds and rubies.


Horse Racing Pays Off
Keith C., Indiana, USA

I found my first US Capped Bust coin after 29 years of detecting on October 5th, 2003! This type of coin was one of my metal detecting goal coins for 2003 but, to be honest, a US Capped Bust coin has been on my goal list for about the last 20 years, at least!

The site used to be a horse race track back in the mid 1800's. I had hunted there the week before and found four nice coins including an 1876 P Seated Dime. I moved to another area and started detecting. Almost immediately, I get this great hit at the top of the screen and find this really nice 1891 P Seated Liberty dime! I thought to myself, "there will be some nice coins come out if this area"! Sure enough, about 15 minutes later I get this really nice hit up near the top of the screen on my Explorer XS.

From experience, I knew this was going to be another good one and would probably be silver! When I removed the plug, the coin came out too. At first I didn't see it but then I noticed a small thin silver coin! I carefully removed it from the soil and thought that it was probably a half dime! I really couldn't tell because it was covered with dirt, so I stopped and walked back to the truck to get some water to wash it off. At first I couldn't tell what is was and my first thought was that it was a coin from another country. Upon closer examination with my 5X magnifying glass I was THRILLED to see that is was an 1835 Capped Bust Half Dime in GREAT shape!!

I found several other great coins at this place that were worth much more than the half dime, but to me, my first Capped Bust coin is worth more than the rest of them combined!

Thanks Minelab for making such a GREAT metal detector!!


A dream come true!
Michael B., Illinois, USA

It was a late November day that the temperature had climbed into the fifties. In NW Illinois, this was a real bonus that I had to cash in. With winter right around the corner, this might be my last chance to hunt until spring.

I headed to a local park that has been very good to me in the past. I set up my Explorer and started detecting.

My first target was in the nickel area on the SMARTFIND screen. I cut a plug and flipped it over. I could see something shining in the hole. I reached in and pulled the object out. "WOW, a gold ring"! I can't explain the feeling except to say it was a dream come true. Thanks Minelab for building this great machine that makes dreams come true!


British One Penny Button
Thomas F., Ontario, Canada

Fresh from the mud at a construction site on the grounds of Historic Erie Beach Amusement Park, I thought it was a large modern winter parka button. At home while taking digital ‘before/after’ cleaning pics, I began to realize the ‘button’ was a broach fashioned from a 1901 British One Penny coin. Gold plated, hand worked with an enhanced bust of Queen Victoria, 1901 was the year in which she passed from this earth. This must have been a treasured keepsake of one of the parks' many visitors and is now one of my most treasured finds. My Explorer continues to both delight and amaze me with it’s ability to find treasured items nestled between the iron reminders of an era of extraordinary craftsmanship.


House Hunting
Don B., Michigan, USA

This is a 1863 Civil War Storecard Token (R-6 Rarity 20-74 Known) it says: E.K. Powers Confectioner & Dealer in Soda Water Grand Rapids Mich.

I was hunting an old house that was being moved and this was found underneath where the porch used to be. There was a lot of trash around this old house and the Explorer XS found this goody amongst all of it! Thanks Minelab for a super detector!


Unearthing Treasure
Rick D., Ontario, Canada

I found this 13th Regiment button at a field that I have been waiting for the owner to plow for the last five years. It has been my best site for war of 1812 relics, but the finds have been pretty thin there for the last couple of years. This fall when they finally plowed it, I had visions of finding all kinds of relics. I was a little disappointed at the end of the day with just a dozen or so of one piece plain buttons.

When I got home and was separating the ones with shanks from those without, I thought I noticed something under the dirt of one. After running it under the water I could see it was a 13th Regiment officers coat button with about 98% of the silver gilt still on it. I had thought it was just another colonial button because of its size and the silver plating on it.


My Experience with the Explorer
Ed G -Ma. USA

My son and I both own a XLT, I had just bought the new Explorer and for the heck of it I followed my son and went over what he was detecting. I found a mercury dime where my son found a alum tab, he thought he only found a tag and missed the mercury dime. He wants the Excalibur 1000 because he is a diver.


My First Gold Coin!
Søren A - Denmark

I have always been dreaming of finding a gold coin!  To me as a coin shooter it was the ultimate goal!  Just one in a "Detector lifetime" would be enough!  Well - A year after buying my Explorer it suddenly happened! A beautiful Dutch gold Tremissis from the 7th century!  Brought to Denmark by the Vikings and used as a medallion!  A truly amazing feeling to pick it up from the soil!  Shining just as the day it was lost!  And now - of course one is not enough!  There is so much out there waiting to be found and believe me, I will be out there with my Explorer!  Greetings from Denmark 


Handful of History
Peter H - Denmark

The story I want to tell, is as follows.  I was out with my friend when the ground suddenly started to produce nice signals, promising that there were small silver coins and indeed there was!  A total of seven nice small hammered silver coins, divided by nothing less than 6 kings, with the time span 1154 to 1559.

I was a very happy man and starting to walk back to my car, I heard a very big constant signal. The thing that was unearthed, shows to be a very nice seal in mint condition. The story was in the national head news. My different types of Minelab machines had never let me down, but this day out with my Explorer, will for ever be something special.

Thanks for some super detectors!


A tree holds lost treasure
Charles D., Oregon USA

I found this Ring while hunting for buttons at a site which was once an old Veteran's home. It is now a school site.

While going along and digging all lower signals, I had already found many buttons from late 1800s early 1900s, the button signals were falling into the pull tab range and I got one signal near a tree that I thought was a pull tab but as I was digging all of them I dug down about 4 inches and out pops a Gold and Emerald ring.

 

 


Another Relic Find!
Don S., Massachusetts USA

While trying some new settings at a site that was suppose to be hunted out I got a smooth low tone hit. I popped a six inch plug and was still receiving a target hit. I popped three more inches from the hole and saw this button. After further research on this button I found that this is an OD1 US Diplomatic button era 1792 - 1802. Thank you Minelab.


Coastal Storms Reveal Treasure
Steve P., New Hampshire USA

We had a coastal storm earlier in the week which I knew from past experience always creates a good chance for some nice finds at our New England beaches. So when the weekend came around I was anxious to head out to one of my favorite beaches and see what the storm had done to the beach.

As soon as I came over the dune onto the beach I knew it was going to be a good day as I could see that the storm had cut several feet of sand off of the beach. I headed down to a spot where there was a 2 foot high drop off and fired up my Explorer XS and set it in iron mask mode at -8, just high enough to cut off most of the lobster trap wire that gets washed up on our beaches after every winter storm.

It wasn’t long before I came to my first signal which was up towards the top right corner of the smart find display but a bit lower than most coins show up. A few scoops with the sand scoop brought up a silver horse shoe pin. Well that is a lucky sign I thought to myself as I started looking for my next target. A few feet later brought another signal not too far off from the first and I quickly uncovered a silver cross. It looks like it had some stones set in it but judging from the tarnish in the settings they had washed out long ago.

After digging a few pull tabs I got a signal that sounded like gold to me and it was right down on the bottom of the smart find about 2/3rd of the way over to the right. I knew it was either a ring or the tab part of a pull tab with the pull part broken off. In a few moments I had the target in the basket of my scoop and was shaking the sand out of it when the glint of gold caught my eye – I had a 18K wedding band.

As I was kicking the sand back into the hole I got another good sounding signal as I waved my Explorer around without even paying attention to it. It was only 2 feet away from where I had just dug the gold ring and this signal sounded exactly the same. The depth indicator showed it was only 3 or 4 inches under the surface and I got it out with the first scoop. And more gold flashed as I shook the sand out of the scoop. My eyes really lit up when I saw the sparkle of diamonds and rubies.


Field Finds
Don S., Mass. USA

Well I found this with my Explorer II in a small field about 40’ x 50’. It was a cloudy, misty type of day and I was short on time. But when this little sweet heart ever came out of my plug from about 7 inches down. Words can't describe the feeling that was rushing through my mind. Once again, thanks Minelab!


Hot Rocks Are No Problem!
Dave H., New York, USA

This is a 1859 silver 3-cent piece that I found with my Explorer II. The coin does not have a high value (only about $25.00), but these are very small and difficult to find. This one was buried about 6" deep next to a "hot rock" in one of our local hunted out parks. I'm sure that many detectors have been waved over it in the past but only my Explorer picked it up. What a machine!

 


Gold Coin Found in England
Gary B., Texas, USA

I was on day 11 of a 14 day detecting vacation in Colchester, England. I was with a group of 5 friends and already a 1500 BC Bronze Age Axe hoard was found, a hoard of 3 gold staters, 1 single axe head, and some nice hammered silver. I was afraid I was going to get skunked on finding something special. I was using the Explorer II at a field we'd be on three separate times.

My friend Shawn had a feeling about this field, and he was right. I was in a corner of the field with few targets being found when I got a signal and dug a plug. At first I thought it was a button until I picked it up and realized it was a gold coin. Of course no one was in ear shot and had to enjoy the moment by myself. It still in England awaiting an export license.

It's officially classified as a "Gallo_Belgic E Stater, C. 56BC class 2 of the type.
 


Gold Coins!
Tommy C., Louisiana, USA

Gold coins!

I live in Louisiana and like to hunt in New Orleans where the 1884 World's Fairs was held. While hunting in the park is very tough, if you go slow you can find some pretty nice stuff.

On the way to the park I told my dad I was going to dig any target that had an ID of a 1, 2, or 3 because of the recent information I learned from the forum about where gold coins ID'ed. My dad and I started hunting around a nice old Live Oak that day in the back of the park and we found a few Indian Cents and even some civil war relics (Confederate soldiers camped there for a long time). The signals were few because over the past year we have been digging there a lot and have removed just about everything that read close to a coin.

After about 10 or 15 pieces of aluminum and nothing to show for it, I heard a soft signal that showed about 5" deep and read a 3 on the digital meter. I cut a nice plug out and when I flipped the plug over I could see the first $1.00 coin. I pulled it out of the plug and ran to dad to show him. After all the excitement I walked back to the hole and checked it for anything else and what do you think I heard? Another signal! I reached in the hole and removed some dirt and there staring me in the face was another beautiful $1.00 gold coin. The dates were 1854 and 1855 and they were in great shape. This is proof that it is very hard to clean out an area unless you are digging everything.


Deep Find
Stan D., Virginia USA

In early Dec. a friend of mine ask me if I wanted to go to an old colonial site. We knew it had been hit hard by others before us but we went anyway. Finds were slim but still managed to pull up some flat buttons and some shoe buckles and other odds and ends from the colonial period. Then I got a weak signal that kept getting stronger as I dug. At about 22" deep this winged object pops out. I didn't know what it was at the time but I knew it had to be something. When I got home I contacted a friend of mine that knew a lot about colonial artifacts. He had told me that it is a family crest from a coat of arms. The coat of arms was to big to attach to things like personal leather cases, sword belts, horse tack, etc. so they used the crest {top of the coat of arms} as an abbreviation. The crescent moon notes that the person was the first son of his family. The second son would have a star symbol impaled in the wings and each son had his own symbol to be used by English heraldry. The father had no symbol as he was holder of the crest. It would date to the second half of the eighteenth century but no later that the Rev. war as they got away from that sort of thing in 1781. As you know, that made my day and is one of the more unique items that I have found. Thanks Minelab.


Explorer Finds More Coins
Chris C., Canada

Charles One Reale Cob

This 1707 Charles Cob 1 Reale was found at a very early French site where many coins and relics had been dug over the past couple of years. It was a cold Nov. morning when two of my fellow hunters (Greg & Camp David) joined me in the hunt that was to turn up the sites first two old silver. To date this is my second oldest silver coin find after my 1706 One Reale which was also an Explorer find.
 


Last Find of the Day
More old coins found with the Explorer II
Brian C., California USA

Pile of Coins found with the Explorer IIWOW what a machine.
The confidence in knowing you can punch down pretty near a foot and pull up Silver consistently is amazing with this puppy. These were all found in sites previously hunted with my DFX. I still love my Whites, but this badboy comes into the house with me. The purple coin at the middle bottom is a 1912 barber. I didn't have room for the 40 or so wheaties too. Most of these were found in 3 hunts. 7 total.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Last Hunt in the Thaw
Chris C., Canada

It was Jan. 1st and a most uncommon ground thaw gave myself and a fellow hunter one last shot at digging before the full punch of winter was to shut us down. The site choice for the day was to be a small French cabin site that had only existed to about the 1750s. This being a well hunted site one can't expect too much, as was the case here up until what I knew was my last 30 minutes digging. The ground frost was getting heavier by the hour and I received one last signal which I knew had the potential to save the day, and it did. This button wasn't real deep so probably just a case of hitting it from the right angle. Certainly a great way to end one season and begin a new year.

Buttons of this type do have a plain face but are still a 250 year old military find!


New Explorer II User
Justin M.

Got my new Explorer II today. I had posted to www.findmall.com before saying that I wanted a new detector and a few of you convinced me to try Explorer. Well I went through my own yard as a test try and to get familiar with it. I have searched my yard with my other two detectors, a Garrett GTI 2500 and a Garrett GTA Ultra 1000, maybe a dozen times.

Well after not more than 2 hours I found these beauties. A 1900 Silver Barber Half, a nice 1916 merc, a rosie and two wheats. The half really surprised me since my house only dates to the late twenties. In the past the best finds from my yard were one lonely rosie and a few wheats. Lets just say I am impressed.

I left it on factory settings since I'm still trying to get used to it. So I feel I've only slightly tapped its power. Pulled the half from about 8 1/2''. Thanks for those who swayed me towards the Explorer and Happy Hunting.


Rare Coin Find
Don H., New Jersey USA

Doing the dirty work.Before CleaningOn December 30 I was hunting with my son and was not having a good day with any finds when I got a nice signal and found a 1775 British Halfpence. My mood was now better and shortly thereafter I got a second beautiful high coin tone and the crosshairs were far upper right! My son, who has eagle eyes, looked at it and right away knew it was a Lettered Edge Large Cent and very thick, with all the crud on it we did not know which year, but it would have to be 1793-95! Perhaps I finally got a 1793!!! No it wasn't but it was a nice 1794, close but no cigar on being my goal coin, but at least after I had it attributed I found out it was a very scarce variety of the 1794 Liberty Cap Large Cents. A Sheldon 19a. I was using the Minelab Explorer XS, original 3 year old version with a Minelab 8 inch coil. I was using Iron Mask -14, Ferrous tones and there was no mistaking this as nothing else but a coin. The coin was approximately 6 inches deep amongst thick green briar.

All Cleaned Up!I did learn something new when attributing this coin. On the lettered edge where it says ONE HUNDRED FOR A DOLLAR , there is a symbol after the word Dollar, that is an Oak Leaf and since the leafs stem and tip of leaf point Down, that identified it as the scarce variety.


Revolutionary War Find
Chris C., Canada

Revolutionary War Cannonball

This cannonball was found on a hunt I was invited to by a few friends that live two hours away.  It was a fantastic day weather-wise, and equally as good for finds.  Other than the cannonball, there was Spanish silver found, Geo II coppers, Jews harps, early French artifacts and many other Colonial era finds.  This cannonball, was a Revolutionary war era 8 pound cannonball.


Diamond and Platinum Ring
Bob K. - New Jersey, USA

Diamond Ring!I was stuck at work all day as the effects of Hurricane Isabel came thought New Jersey. I was hoping the winds would died down some, so after work I could hit the beach. My Explorer batteries were home charging up. There where strong NE winds all night and most of the day. Makes for good hunting at our New Jersey beaches. I got home at about 5:30, ate a sandwich and was out the door by 5:50. I headed to my favorite beach in Sea Isle City, NJ. One hour later I was on the beach. It was dark and the wind was still blowing about 25 mph out of the west. It was 30 minutes before low tide.

I noticed right away some sand had been removed from the beach, a nice washout was right in front of me. I started in the washout, one trip down to the water's edge and nothing but a dime and a penny. I turned around and headed up the beach. I was just about ready to turn around when I got a low tone sound and the crosshairs at the bottom of the screen. The tone sounded to good to past up. One scoop and the target was still in the hole. Second scoop, got it.

I saw what looked like a silver or white gold right. I am thinking white gold because of the low tone. I could see the underside of the ring in the basket, I knew by the construction there must be channel set stones. I turned it over and saw diamonds, I hoped they were. But I knew this was it , my first diamond ring. It was to dark for checking it out, and I didn't want to walk back to the car. No this was it, my first diamond ring. Into the pocket it went. I only found coins for the next two hours.

My wife took the ring to our local jeweler. He conformed the diamonds were real. Twelve channel set stones, weight 1/2 carat, retail $1000. The band it turns out is platinum. My wife had it sized to fit her, cost me $63.00. A $1000 ring for $63.00 not to bad.

Thank you Minelab!


A Find Of A Lifetime
Michael K - Ohio, USA 

I've had several detectors over the years and was getting to the point of were I wanted to upgrade to a new detector. So I started to research all the new models out there and talked with several experienced detectorists from each group. Well the Minelab Explorer had them all beat! So I went out and purchased one it was an Explorer 2.

After reading the Manual and having talked to a friend that had an Explorer for 3 years. He told me to put the smallest coil I had on it and adjust the threshold tone down to were it was just audible, also to keep it in factory preset mode for at least 20 hours and run it in auto sensitivity.  Next he told me to go and detect in my local school play grounds in the mulch for those 20 hours. Reason being it was easy digging, not much trash to deal with right off the bat and he
told me that I needed to learn what a good coin sounded like.

So after 20 hours I was able to tell yea if it was a quarter, nickel, dime or penny and I actually found a gold ring there also. So I was ready for the next level which Randy suggested that I run it in Iron Mask -10 manual sensitivity. Wow there was a lot of tones after switching to that but when I came across a coin I knew it because I had dug so many coins before hand that it was kind an easy.

In about 3 months I had already doubled my finds from the previous year needless to say I was a very happy camper.  Up till now I had not really dug any coins deeper than 6" and I new that this machine would go deeper. I had talked to lots of guys on the forums which helped somewhat, but nothing replaced hunting with some seasoned Explorer users!  I went over to Illinois and hunted with Ric, Golddigger, and TC.  These guys were digging Indians and seated coins at depths of 10 to 12 inches.  They tried to explain to me over the phone and through emails what a deep coin sounds like but that is something that can't be put into words or writing.  It's something you just have to hear!

So by the time I had gotten to the park to meet these guys they already had a dozen little flags all over this park that they marked as deep targets that could have been anything from Indians to deep silver! So after chatting with these guys for a few minutes Golddigger checked out my setup and made a few changes and we headed out to check them out.  Let me tell yea they don't sound anything like a shallow coin would have sounded! Matter of fact they sounded kinda nasty and it didn't sound like a coin should have sounded to me! So we dug all these targets but none of them were coins but they were targets that you have to dig if you wanna dig old coins! Some were little pieces of copper wire to small pieces of lead, none of the targets were Iron and some had Iron next to them and I was amazed how the Explorer seen right through the Iron target to what we thought was a good
target below it.

So after digging all these targets and some more talk about deep targets we headed out to see what we all could dig up.  After about 30 mins of detecting I came across a target that was about 6-7" deep and sounded nasty it was a broken up sound and the cursor jumped on the screen. It had the tone of silver but also nulled out also. I used a few techniques that Golddigger taught me. Like once I get a good sound he suggested that I turn about 20 degrees and check it again and do this all the way around. Once I have a spot marked on the ground were I think the target should be he suggested to move your coil away from there and switch to pin point mode and if it pin points small like a coin would and it pin points right were I thought it was while sweeping in Disc mode.

He said dig it!!! So I dropped down and began to cut my plug and at the bottom of the hole was this silver seated coin along with a big nasty square nail lying right on top of the coin also. So I threw out a big Yell 'woohoooo' I
found a flying eagle! Well everyone came running over and Ric said you had better not have found a flying eagle in his park just joking and they all looked at it and said do you know what you have found? I said yea my first seated coin! Golddigger said don't rub it let me see it so I handed it to him and he poured soapy water over it to get the dirt off of it and he said you have found a 20 cent piece.   He said I've been detecting 30 years and have never found one of these and He commented on that it is most peoples gold coin!!!

I plan on getting it slabbed and he figured it would probably grade in around MS-63 with Environmental Damage! If I wanted to sell it I have been offered $1500.00 from a coin collector! So had I wanted to sell it I could have paid for my machine already!!!  Since then I have dug many coin firsts for me and it gets better and better.  My deepest coin is 11" at a old park and right at 24" at the beach. If anyone wants to see my coins here is my web site and everything found in 2003 was with the explorer & a few in 2002! The Link http://mike45177.tripod.com/index.html

There is no better machine on the market I'm convinced of that and I will always own an Explorer. 


"The Explorer II makes those hunted out sites new again"

I had the pleasure of using the new Explorer II last night. A friend and I went to a spot that has been pounded for the last 10 years with just about every new machine of any reputation. Fisher CZ's, 1270, 1266 Whites MXT, DFX, XLT E series Tesoro machines of several different models and even the original Explorer have been used on this site. He had a chance to hunt it before I got off work and dug the Navy button and Eagle button in about 30 minutes. When I asked how much trash he’d dug, his response was "None" It is worthy to mention that neither he or I have read the new Explorer Manual. It was obvious almost immediately that this machine is not your old Explorer. The response time was incredible and the depth was not compromised. The machine worked well in the old home site that was littered with square nails and iron objects of all shapes and sizes.

I did dig a couple of pieces of iron but I was certain that it was iron before inserting my shovel in the ground. There were several targets that had been passed over that the new Explorer II picked up effortlessly. Terry dug a pants button and piece of lead that looked to be a bullet carved into a pencil from holes that had already been excavated. The depth meter was much more accurate than the original. The audio response was great and signals were positive and repeatable at impressive depths.  I dug a .40 caliber bullet at 11" with a good repeatable signal. I can't say enough about the new Explorer II. As with the old Explorer "It makes those hunted out sites new again". I didn't think it could possibly get any better but Minelab has once again outdone themselves.  Thanks for an excellent product.
 


My New Explorer II is better than my trusty Explorer XS!

Dear Minelab,

My wife and children gave me a new Explorer II just this month as a college graduation present and I had high hopes that it would do as well, and hopefully better, as my trusty E1.  I stopped by an old home under renovation near Elkins, West Virginia last week and asked for permission to detect the dirtpiles and torn up lawn.  The job foreman told me, "knock yourself out!" but warned that the property had been hunted many times and as recently as the previous week.   My very first signal was a high tone "peep!" at 7" that repeated with every sweep of my coil.  After digging down and checking the hole, my signal at first vanished, but an inspection of my diggings turned up this incredible 1834 silver half dime!  The Minelab E2 came through where many other machines had likely passed by! 

Thanks for a GREAT machine. 


The Explorer II is truly AWESOME!

First day I had ever used the Explorer-II and I get an 1899 Barber Quarter.


The Explorer II is truly AWESOME! 


Thanks for a FANTASTIC Detector!


What a Nugget!
 

The GP3000 strikes again! My buddy Frank found this nugget while hunting in a ground sluice area. Someone had dug the piece out of the ground and it rolled down the hill about 2 1/2 feet below the hole. This is the biggest nugget from the area that I know of. 
 
Hey guys get with the program check those holes.  
 
Chip
ROUST- A- Bout Detector Sales


I give the GP3000 the THUMBS UP!
Gerry M - Idaho, USA

It does everything my trusty GP-Extreme does and more. Smoother threshold... Cleaner signal response... Better head-saver when going over large targets..   Even though I did not dig any deep targets on this trip, I could tell that this machine does have the same capabilities.

Is it worth it to upgrade to the 3000????  For me, a nugget hunter, I want every advantage I can get. And if I am going to be out there doing this, then I want the best machine for the situation at hand. In my opinion that is the new GP3000 for the size of gold I am after and the areas I detect.

 


Yet Another Excellent Prospecting Machine!

On my first trial with the GP 3000, I went to a nearby area that has received a fair bit of attention over the years and which I had previously gridded with the GP extreme.  The GP 3000 threshold was noticeably smoother and more stable despite the somewhat variable ground.  After a couple of hours I heard a sound, so using the 'ground balance and switch to fixed' technique, I rechecked the sound and was still uncertain.  Eventually I decided to dig and on trenching out about 8 to 9 inches, I put the coil in sideways and the audio screamed.  At 15 inches I unearthed a solid nugget which weighed in at exactly 62gm or 2 oz...a bloody good start to the GP 3000!  Congratulations Minelab on yet another excellent prospecting machine.
 


The GP Extreme is the "King of Performance"
Rob A.

The GP Extreme is the "King of Performance". It's the only machine I use... especially after unearthing a 9.1 ounce gold nugget at 28" deep in an area where conventional detectors have searched many times before.


My First Minelab Detector
Randy H - Iowa, USA 

I have enjoyed the hobby of metal detecting since 1974.  I suffered a spinal injury a few years ago, and have not been able to metal detect due to my physical impairment.  When Minelab came out with the new Advantage, I read about the lightweight thin coils and hip mount capability and decided that these features may allow me to once again participate in the hobby I relished for so for many years.  A hobby that I had only enjoyed in my dreams since the injury.  My doctor encouraged me to give it a try as the physical exercise will benefit my cardiovascular, not to mention the psychological benefits of being outside in the fresh air.  Like he said, I know my physical limitations.  What I can do and what I can't.  So, I decided to give it a try. 

I bought the new Minelab Advantage with the additional accessories offered in the Pro Pack.  I have used many different brands over the past 29 years, but this is my first Minelab product.  Although I have only had it a few months, I will say that it is very well balanced and the hip mount allows me to detect without putting undue stress on my body.  The Advantage is, without a doubt, the deepest seeking detector I have ever owned.  It is a pleasure to use. I am quite pleased with the new Advantage.  Let me tell you why.    

Living in the Midwest, I don't have access to the early coins of the 1700's or the old battlefields I read about.  My part of the state was not settled until the mid 1850's, so digging Indian cents and Barber dimes makes for a good day.  Finding an occasional Seated Liberty is very exciting.  I spend a lot of time in the winter months reading about and researching places where early settlers may have congregated.  Old Chautauqua Grounds, Fair Grounds and Picnic areas are among my favorites.  I might still stop by an old school ground or abandon church yard, but most of my time is spent in places that to the "normal person" appear as a corn field or pasture.  This is where I like to hunt.  I don't have to worry about tuning out pull tabs because these areas were long forgotten when aluminum came into the marketplace. 

I'm out there in the field, literally, where the only noises are meadowlarks and my detector telling me that I may have found a good one.  There is an old picnic area about a short drive from my house that I had searched thoroughly back in the late 70's.  A relatively small parcel of ground, surrounded by pastures and a creek.  I had only been there once in the past 5 years, but had found a couple Barber dimes during my last visit.  I was anxious to get back there with the new Advantage and see just what was buried "beyond the reach" of my previous detectors.  We have had quite a bit of rain here the past month, so the soil is very damp and easy digging.  I arrived at the site and strapped on the Advantage.  I connected the 10" coil, hoping to find some of the deeper coins that had avoided my earlier trips. 

After searching for about 30 minutes, I got my first signal.  It was a clad quarter, about 2 inches deep.  Finding this newer coin told me that, although this site was 'abandoned", there had been others here in the recent past.  Possibly other metal detectors!  So much for my "secret place".  During the next half hour I found a memorial cent, making me wonder if this area was "hunted out", as so many seem to be.  Feeling fatigued, I decided to switch to my 8" coil to "lighten the load".  I had only walked about 30 feet when I got a sweet - solid signal.

I checked the discriminator to make sure I had it advanced to null out the occasional piece of junk and found that it was running full discriminate. This had to be a good target.  I carefully dug a hole to a depth of 7 inches and removed the plug of soil.  ( I know it was seven inches because my digging tool is marked for depth).  I rescanned the area and found the target was still in the hole.  I dug down another couple inches and there it was, glimmering in the sunlight.  The distinctive reeded edge of a silver coin.  Not just a silver coin, but THE silver coin that had eluded me and undoubtedly others in our previous hunts. 

During the past 29 years, I have found hundreds of old silver dimes, quarters and half dollars.  But this was not a dime, quarter or half dollar.  This was a beautiful 1888 O Morgan Silver Dollar and it was in excellent condition. My first Morgan Silver dollar, found in an area that I (and countless others) had missed during our previous hunts.  I have no doubt that I had walked over this coin several times in my previous hunts and had not gotten a signal.  Why was today the day that she decided to give herself up?  Was it the deep-seeking characteristics of the Advantage or was it fate?  I'll leave that for you to decide.  All I know is that the Minelab Advantage paid for itself many times over with that one find.  A beautiful day to be alive, a Minelab Advantage and a Morgan Silver Dollar that had avoided detection for over 100 years. 

Thank you for building the lightweight, deep-seeking Minelab Advantage.  An affordable machine that allowed me the opportunity to rediscover my dreams, in more ways than one.


Musketeer Advantage - a huge hit with the family

The Minelab Advantage Detector  I purchased from you on Tuesday was a huge hit with the family.  We went to an old  school site in Kapunda that has a reputation for being haunted and within 6 feet of the gate we found $1.15 and some old brass belt buckles, and other old relics.  Very pleased with the purchase and thank you for your friendly service and knowledge.

....We have continued to gain experience with the detector and over the past week we have found 3 very old brass thimbles, a 1924 penny , a 1922 Shilling (really deep in the ground to) and 3 old dog tags.  I have sent a photo of them. They are dated  1907, 1908 and 1927.  It is unbelievable what and where these things turn up.
Thank you again.


It was like hunting for the first time

I decided to go with the new Minelab Musketeer Advantage, having good success with the older style (Green) Musketeer in the past I knew it would be a great detector for hunting Civil War Relics. I had permission to hunt a Civil War Confederate Cavalry Camp about an hour away, I had hunted this site several times in the past with lots of different brand's of top of the line detector's. To be honest I did not have much hope of finding to much since that particular site had been detected pretty hard in the past. After arriving, within just a few minutes, I heard my first response and it sounded like a good target so I got out my digger, Since I had hunted this site several times in the past I knew how deep most of the relics were going to be or so I thought, after retrieving a target which was about 2" deeper than anything that I had ever dug at this site before…it was like hunting the site for the first time…Oh Yeah I forgot to mention first target that I got with the Advantage was a CW Pistol Bullet… I've used it at several of my old detecting sites in the past 30 days from Dalton GA. to Atlanta GA, I'm amazed each time that I use it.  Thanks for a great detector.

In the photo you will see a few items that my wife Leslie & I found ( Don't forget family hobby ) while out metal detecting in February of 2003.  While out using our Minelab Musketeer Advantage (with a 10" Coil), these items were all found at sites that we have hunted in the past. The round item in the center was found at a site where we have found Civil War Relics in the past, but I do not know what it is for sure yet.  It's made of brass an it has some type of crystal or marble in the center of it (could be a rosette or hat pin). The item below it is a Civil War belt buckle keeper there is a number in the top left hand corner that will match the number on the belt buckle (when we find it) This belt buckle keeper was found at an old home site. One item that I really like in the photo is the Ladies Silver wedding Band which was also found at an old house site ( Being small an thin like this ladies Sterling Silver Wedding band proves a great metal detector ). This house site goes way back, I could tell by the metal that we were digging. They did not have electric and they did not have a car this was a old site that we found with our Advantage. Also in the photo you will see flat buttons , Indian Head Pennies , Civil War Bullets, pocket watch parts, knapsack Parts, etc. All of these Items were dug in the North GA area.


The Nugget I Found Near Kambalda, Western Australia

After about 3hrs and ½ ton of cans, nails and bullets, I decided I'd had enough and headed back towards the car, waving my Minelab detector around half heartedly when it went off.  I was only 20m from my vehicle, and I had walked about 5 kilometers.  I dug up this little beauty.  


An amazing gold coin find!
Ray S., California, USA

I woke up to go to work on April 4, 2003. I'm a roofing contractor and when I headed to my truck, I realized someone had broken into my toolbox, stealing several nail guns and a saw. Well, I was mad to say the least, so after giving my report to the police, I decided to take the morning off, so some detecting to cool down and relax.

I grabbed my old beat up reliable Sovereign with the Sunray S-12 coil and headed to some houses that are in the process of being moved. The houses are up in the air on blocks, so it is easy to stand upright under them and hunt. The fist signal I got was a loud high-pitched signal that was breaking up. It read 180 on my meter, but I thought it may be a big chunk of iron causing it to be false. Well, I plunged my Letch in the dirt, popped out a big chunk of dirt and I see this BIG gold disc in the dirt. My first thought was that it must be some kids play money. Well, I picked it up, felt the weight and about the same time I knocked some dirt off and almost soiled myself when I saw the date - 1890! I flipped it over and read "20 dollars" with a S mint mark. I had a real hard time containing myself.

I continued to hunt for over an hour or so and every signal I got after that I would think "alright, maybe this is another one", but only got a couple of wheats and an Australian half penny. Well, that was my story, thanks for letting me share my best find ever with ya.
 


Danny M - Northern Ireland

I recently purchased a new Minelab Sovereign Elite and am delighted to say, was taken completely by surprise!  When it arrived I opened the box to reveal this highly streamline metal detector and could not wait to try it out.  After assembling the Elite and adjusting the settings, I went off to one of my usual haunts to try it out.  Upon arrival at site, I turned the Elite on and took two steps into the filed, only to receive a positive signal straight away.  I dug down to retrieve the target and turned the sod over and checked through it for my prize, but it was still in the hole.  I then dug down a further spades depth and to my surprise a beautiful silver hammered coin at over 9 inches!

The Minelab Sovereign Elite is a lovely, lightweight and well balanced machine which makes it more comfortable in detecting for long periods of time.  It is super deep and has excellent discrimination and quick target retrieval.  This is the best Minelab Sovereign ever thanks to Minelab's new BBS Technology, this machine is a must for every detectorist!

Thank you Minelab.


Minelab Sovereign Elite

Minelab has certainly done their homework with the Elite. Here at last we have a detector that not only looks good but its performance in the field has improved beyond my wildest expectations. The new Tornado coil has totally transformed the Sovereign Elite - it’s sharp, fast and accurate pinpointing of targets was what pleased me most about this machine. On the most extremely mineralised and iron infested soil I have yet searched on I didn’t dig one ferrous item from the ground. In addition to this, no longer do we experience control boxes falling off the stem or battery compartment covers coming adrift - the redesigned control box with its unique method of attachment to the stem that incorporates a battery system that locks into position, combined with the ability to totally ignore iron, make this detector a leader in its class. Equally at home on the beach or inland, the thought that Minelab have put into the detail of this transformed Sovereign more than compensate for the heavier than average weight and make it a “must have one” for the dedicated detectorist.


The "Elite" strikes a Hammered Chord

These photos show my 1st Hammered coin with the New Minelab Elite


I first started detecting in the early 1970's and until the advent of the Minelab Explorer, I had used Whites Detectors for the last ten years.  I felt that with the new technology "Multi Frequency" I would be able to revisit all those sites that had previously been worked to death, The Explorer sure lived up to its name, in the last two years I have never found as many hammered coins.

Alas, the only problem I had, with old age catching me up fast,  was the weight of the Explorer which was reintroducing my Tennis Elbow, previously gained by many years of sweeping those motion machines and being told that the faster you sweep the more the rewards shall be.  I decided that I just had to change to a  Hip Mount system, I did try an American Hip Mount conversion kit for the Explorer, but it turned out  not to be ideal, you cannot beat a manufacturer's genuine Hipmount system.

Whites kindly offered to convert one of the new DFX's for me, but the dual frequency along with the extremely difficult learning curve ( Different Settings required for almost each site )  just didn't match the raw processing power of the Explorer.

And then a light suddenly appeared at the end of the tunnel, my copy of both the "Treasure Hunting" & "The Searcher" magazine came through the letterbox, and in true Minelab tradition, with no previous mention on their internet site was this advert for the "The New Sovereign Elite",  and yes it had 17 Frequencies and more importantly it was either Chest or Hip Mountable

The machine was supplied to me by Crawford Metal Detectors from Scunthorpe, who covered all the controls in no time, showing me the best way to maximise the system.  Next having recently moved I needed to acquire some local land to detect upon and then my wonderful wife informed me of her long lost cousin, who just happened to be married to a local farmer….."No problem ", he said, go anywhere you like and so today 3rd December 2002, I arrived at one of his fields.

Remembering the simplicity of the controls shown to me by Crawfords, I set the machine in Variable Tone / Auto Sensitivity / All Metal and started to detect, the very 1st signal that I received was the coin as illustrated, a Hammered Silver 3d of Elizabeth I.  Over the next two hours I was amazed at the loudness of the signals received, even better than the Explorer, and with far less weight, many of the finds were coming from beyond 7" in depth and were just minute buttons.  The machine really is in an Elite category all by itself, its ease of use in the field, with the ability to just flick a switch between "All Metal" & "Discriminate" Mode / "Fixed" & "Variable" Tone ID, plus the boon of either Hip or Chest Mounting must surely make this another winner for both Minelab and You.

Finally I come from a Computer Background and therefore understand all this new jargon surrounding some of the new top of the range detector systems, In fact, many people having realised how complicated these systems are, have exploited us by writing books on how, by pressing this button, turning off this feature, upping this sensitivity, turning up the preamp gain etc., you will be able to go that extra centimeter or so.

I feel that after 30 years detecting, that what most of us really don't want to do is learn to become a Computer Technician, or start tweaking all those setting to get the best from the machine.

Now with the "New Minelab Elite", it's back to how it was in the old days with all the latest technology (17 Frequency BBS, Digital Ground Balance etc.) handled by the machine, leaving us the detectorists just the job of digging up all those targets.


Sovereign Letter

Dear Minelab

Several times a year I travel to Poland to visit my girlfriend. While visiting here, I always take my Sovereign and go detecting on the beach near where she lives. I consistently find enough money to pay the costs for the trip, this enabling me to see her more often.

I have really enjoyed using the sovereign and have found a great deal of treasure with it. In fact, after owning the Sovereign for only a short while, I found enough treasure to pay for it. This is the best detector I’ve used. It handles mineralization and salt extremely well, enabling me to find targets that other treasure hunters have missed.

The depth of the sovereign is absolutely amazing. I have recovered many treasures from treasures from depths of up to 14 inches in heavily mineralized soil.  The pictures that I sent you (shown to the right) are of treasures that I found in Valkenisse, an Old Dutch village. All treasures are dated between the years of 1375 and 1500.

Once again, I really enjoy using the sovereign. Thank you for producing such a fantastic detector.

Sincerely,
John V


The Sovereign Pro has made coin-hunting an adventure again!
Fred P - Colorado, USA

I have used many kinds of detectors over the years. I used to think detectors featuring target ID were state-of-the-art. But after using a Minelab Sovereign Pro, I have realized I was wrong. This detector can be adjusted to flawlessly distinguish good targets from bad, even in heavily trashy areas. The key I found was to set the level of discrimination to the point where you get a broken audio response on screw caps and other objects you dig up which your preliminary settings fail to discriminate.

Even at higher levels of discrimination, the Sovereign Pro could clearly detect pennies and dimes at 9 inches down, even when surrounded by trash objects. I had never experienced this level of accuracy in trashy areas with other, single-frequency detectors before. Pinpointing was also accurate, fast and easy whenever the target was "x"ed in all-metals mode.  I averaged coin recovery at about one every 30 seconds in a park where trash had been such a problem that previously it had been hard to distinguish good targets from bad ones. It was almost like walking around and picking coins up off the ground! I was using the 10" (1000) coil during the test. With other detectors, I discovered that this size coil was usually too large to distinguish trash from treasure in heavily trashy areas. With the 17 frequencies of the Sovereign Pro, I had no problem accurately detecting and pinpointing good targets among undesirable ones, quickly and easily. The Sovereign Pro has made coin-hunting an adventure again, because of the high rate of good target recovery and minimal level of frustration due to false signals. The ability to mount the control box underneath the rear of the handle balances the heavier 1000 coil, and the heavy-duty construction enables the Sovereign Pro to stand up to heavy use.

Congratulations, Minelab, for a job well done!

 

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My First Minelab Detector
Randy H - Iowa, USA 

I have enjoyed the hobby of metal detecting since 1974.  I suffered a spinal injury a few years ago, and have not been able to metal detect due to my physical impairment.  When Minelab came out with the new Advantage, I read about the lightweight thin coils and hip mount capability and decided that these features may allow me to once again participate in the hobby I relished for so for many years.  A hobby that I had only enjoyed in my dreams since the injury.  My doctor encouraged me to give it a try as the physical exercise will benefit my cardiovascular, not to mention the psychological benefits of being outside in the fresh air.  Like he said, I know my physical limitations.  What I can do and what I can't.  So, I decided to give it a try. 

I bought the new Minelab Advantage with the additional accessories offered in the Pro Pack.  I have used many different brands over the past 29 years, but this is my first Minelab product.  Although I have only had it a few months, I will say that it is very well balanced and the hip mount allows me to detect without putting undue stress on my body.  The Advantage is, without a doubt, the deepest seeking detector I have ever owned.  It is a pleasure to use. I am quite pleased with the new Advantage.  Let me tell you why.    

Living in the Midwest, I don't have access to the early coins of the 1700's or the old battlefields I read about.  My part of the state was not settled until the mid 1850's, so digging Indian cents and Barber dimes makes for a good day.  Finding an occasional Seated Liberty is very exciting.  I spend a lot of time in the winter months reading about and researching places where early settlers may have congregated.  Old Chautauqua Grounds, Fair Grounds and Picnic areas are among my favorites.  I might still stop by an old school ground or abandon church yard, but most of my time is spent in places that to the "normal person" appear as a corn field or pasture.  This is where I like to hunt.  I don't have to worry about tuning out pull tabs because these areas were long forgotten when aluminum came into the marketplace. 

I'm out there in the field, literally, where the only noises are meadowlarks and my detector telling me that I may have found a good one.  There is an old picnic area about a short drive from my house that I had searched thoroughly back in the late 70's.  A relatively small parcel of ground, surrounded by pastures and a creek.  I had only been there once in the past 5 years, but had found a couple Barber dimes during my last visit.  I was anxious to get back there with the new Advantage and see just what was buried "beyond the reach" of my previous detectors.  We have had quite a bit of rain here the past month, so the soil is very damp and easy digging.  I arrived at the site and strapped on the Advantage.  I connected the 10" coil, hoping to find some of the deeper coins that had avoided my earlier trips. 

After searching for about 30 minutes, I got my first signal.  It was a clad quarter, about 2 inches deep.  Finding this newer coin told me that, although this site was 'abandoned", there had been others here in the recent past.  Possibly other metal detectors!  So much for my "secret place".  During the next half hour I found a memorial cent, making me wonder if this area was "hunted out", as so many seem to be.  Feeling fatigued, I decided to switch to my 8" coil to "lighten the load".  I had only walked about 30 feet when I got a sweet - solid signal.

I checked the discriminator to make sure I had it advanced to null out the occasional piece of junk and found that it was running full discriminate. This had to be a good target.  I carefully dug a hole to a depth of 7 inches and removed the plug of soil.  ( I know it was seven inches because my digging tool is marked for depth).  I rescanned the area and found the target was still in the hole.  I dug down another couple inches and there it was, glimmering in the sunlight.  The distinctive reeded edge of a silver coin.  Not just a silver coin, but THE silver coin that had eluded me and undoubtedly others in our previous hunts. 

During the past 29 years, I have found hundreds of old silver dimes, quarters and half dollars.  But this was not a dime, quarter or half dollar.  This was a beautiful 1888 O Morgan Silver Dollar and it was in excellent condition. My first Morgan Silver dollar, found in an area that I (and countless others) had missed during our previous hunts.  I have no doubt that I had walked over this coin several times in my previous hunts and had not gotten a signal.  Why was today the day that she decided to give herself up?  Was it the deep-seeking characteristics of the Advantage or was it fate?  I'll leave that for you to decide.  All I know is that the Minelab Advantage paid for itself many times over with that one find.  A beautiful day to be alive, a Minelab Advantage and a Morgan Silver Dollar that had avoided detection for over 100 years. 

Thank you for building the lightweight, deep-seeking Minelab Advantage.  An affordable machine that allowed me the opportunity to rediscover my dreams, in more ways than one.


Musketeer Advantage - a huge hit with the family

The Minelab Advantage Detector  I purchased from you on Tuesday was a huge hit with the family.  We went to an old  school site in Kapunda that has a reputation for being haunted and within 6 feet of the gate we found $1.15 and some old brass belt buckles, and other old relics.  Very pleased with the purchase and thank you for your friendly service and knowledge.

....We have continued to gain experience with the detector and over the past week we have found 3 very old brass thimbles, a 1924 penny , a 1922 Shilling (really deep in the ground to) and 3 old dog tags.  I have sent a photo of them. They are dated  1907, 1908 and 1927.  It is unbelievable what and where these things turn up.
Thank you again.


It was like hunting for the first time

I decided to go with the new Minelab Musketeer Advantage, having good success with the older style (Green) Musketeer in the past I knew it would be a great detector for hunting Civil War Relics. I had permission to hunt a Civil War Confederate Cavalry Camp about an hour away, I had hunted this site several times in the past with lots of different brand's of top of the line detector's. To be honest I did not have much hope of finding to much since that particular site had been detected pretty hard in the past. After arriving, within just a few minutes, I heard my first response and it sounded like a good target so I got out my digger, Since I had hunted this site several times in the past I knew how deep most of the relics were going to be or so I thought, after retrieving a target which was about 2" deeper than anything that I had ever dug at this site before…it was like hunting the site for the first time…Oh Yeah I forgot to mention first target that I got with the Advantage was a CW Pistol Bullet… I've used it at several of my old detecting sites in the past 30 days from Dalton GA. to Atlanta GA, I'm amazed each time that I use it.  Thanks for a great detector.

In the photo you will see a few items that my wife Leslie & I found ( Don't forget family hobby ) while out metal detecting in February of 2003.  While out using our Minelab Musketeer Advantage (with a 10" Coil), these items were all found at sites that we have hunted in the past. The round item in the center was found at a site where we have found Civil War Relics in the past, but I do not know what it is for sure yet.  It's made of brass an it has some type of crystal or marble in the center of it (could be a rosette or hat pin). The item below it is a Civil War belt buckle keeper there is a number in the top left hand corner that will match the number on the belt buckle (when we find it) This belt buckle keeper was found at an old home site. One item that I really like in the photo is the Ladies Silver wedding Band which was also found at an old house site ( Being small an thin like this ladies Sterling Silver Wedding band proves a great metal detector ). This house site goes way back, I could tell by the metal that we were digging. They did not have electric and they did not have a car this was a old site that we found with our Advantage. Also in the photo you will see flat buttons , Indian Head Pennies , Civil War Bullets, pocket watch parts, knapsack Parts, etc. All of these Items were dug in the North GA area.


The Nugget I Found Near Kambalda, Western Australia

After about 3hrs and ½ ton of cans, nails and bullets, I decided I'd had enough and headed back towards the car, waving my Minelab detector around half heartedly when it went off.  I was only 20m from my vehicle, and I had walked about 5 kilometers.  I dug up this little beauty.  


The New Minelab Elite took me completely by surprise!
Danny M - Northern Ireland

I recently purchased a new Minelab Sovereign Elite and am delighted to say, was taken completely by surprise!  When it arrived I opened the box to reveal this highly streamline metal detector and could not wait to try it out.  After assembling the Elite and adjusting the settings, I went off to one of my usual haunts to try it out.  Upon arrival at site, I turned the Elite on and took two steps into the filed, only to receive a positive signal straight away.  I dug down to retrieve the target and turned the sod over and checked through it for my prize, but it was still in the hole.  I then dug down a further spades depth and to my surprise a beautiful silver hammered coin at over 9 inches!

The Minelab Sovereign Elite is a lovely, lightweight and well balanced machine which makes it more comfortable in detecting for long periods of time.  It is super deep and has excellent discrimination and quick target retrieval.  This is the best Minelab Sovereign ever thanks to Minelab's new BBS Technology, this machine is a must for every detectorist!

Thank you Minelab.


Minelab Sovereign Elite

Minelab has certainly done their homework with the Elite. Here at last we have a detector that not only looks good but its performance in the field has improved beyond my wildest expectations. The new Tornado coil has totally transformed the Sovereign Elite - it’s sharp, fast and accurate pinpointing of targets was what pleased me most about this machine. On the most extremely mineralised and iron infested soil I have yet searched on I didn’t dig one ferrous item from the ground. In addition to this, no longer do we experience control boxes falling off the stem or battery compartment covers coming adrift - the redesigned control box with its unique method of attachment to the stem that incorporates a battery system that locks into position, combined with the ability to totally ignore iron, make this detector a leader in its class. Equally at home on the beach or inland, the thought that Minelab have put into the detail of this transformed Sovereign more than compensate for the heavier than average weight and make it a “must have one” for the dedicated detectorist.


The "Elite" strikes a Hammered Chord

These photos show my 1st Hammered coin with the New Minelab Elite


I first started detecting in the early 1970's and until the advent of the Minelab Explorer, I had used Whites Detectors for the last ten years.  I felt that with the new technology "Multi Frequency" I would be able to revisit all those sites that had previously been worked to death, The Explorer sure lived up to its name, in the last two years I have never found as many hammered coins.

Alas, the only problem I had, with old age catching me up fast,  was the weight of the Explorer which was reintroducing my Tennis Elbow, previously gained by many years of sweeping those motion machines and being told that the faster you sweep the more the rewards shall be.  I decided that I just had to change to a  Hip Mount system, I did try an American Hip Mount conversion kit for the Explorer, but it turned out  not to be ideal, you cannot beat a manufacturer's genuine Hipmount system.

Whites kindly offered to convert one of the new DFX's for me, but the dual frequency along with the extremely difficult learning curve ( Different Settings required for almost each site )  just didn't match the raw processing power of the Explorer.

And then a light suddenly appeared at the end of the tunnel, my copy of both the "Treasure Hunting" & "The Searcher" magazine came through the letterbox, and in true Minelab tradition, with no previous mention on their internet site was this advert for the "The New Sovereign Elite",  and yes it had 17 Frequencies and more importantly it was either Chest or Hip Mountable

The machine was supplied to me by Crawford Metal Detectors from Scunthorpe, who covered all the controls in no time, showing me the best way to maximise the system.  Next having recently moved I needed to acquire some local land to detect upon and then my wonderful wife informed me of her long lost cousin, who just happened to be married to a local farmer….."No problem ", he said, go anywhere you like and so today 3rd December 2002, I arrived at one of his fields.

Remembering the simplicity of the controls shown to me by Crawfords, I set the machine in Variable Tone / Auto Sensitivity / All Metal and started to detect, the very 1st signal that I received was the coin as illustrated, a Hammered Silver 3d of Elizabeth I.  Over the next two hours I was amazed at the loudness of the signals received, even better than the Explorer, and with far less weight, many of the finds were coming from beyond 7" in depth and were just minute buttons.  The machine really is in an Elite category all by itself, its ease of use in the field, with the ability to just flick a switch between "All Metal" & "Discriminate" Mode / "Fixed" & "Variable" Tone ID, plus the boon of either Hip or Chest Mounting must surely make this another winner for both Minelab and You.

Finally I come from a Computer Background and therefore understand all this new jargon surrounding some of the new top of the range detector systems, In fact, many people having realised how complicated these systems are, have exploited us by writing books on how, by pressing this button, turning off this feature, upping this sensitivity, turning up the preamp gain etc., you will be able to go that extra centimeter or so.

I feel that after 30 years detecting, that what most of us really don't want to do is learn to become a Computer Technician, or start tweaking all those setting to get the best from the machine.

Now with the "New Minelab Elite", it's back to how it was in the old days with all the latest technology (17 Frequency BBS, Digital Ground Balance etc.) handled by the machine, leaving us the detectorists just the job of digging up all those targets.


Sovereign Letter

Dear Minelab

Several times a year I travel to Poland to visit my girlfriend. While visiting here, I always take my Sovereign and go detecting on the beach near where she lives. I consistently find enough money to pay the costs for the trip, this enabling me to see her more often.

I have really enjoyed using the sovereign and have found a great deal of treasure with it. In fact, after owning the Sovereign for only a short while, I found enough treasure to pay for it. This is the best detector I’ve used. It handles mineralization and salt extremely well, enabling me to find targets that other treasure hunters have missed.

The depth of the sovereign is absolutely amazing. I have recovered many treasures from treasures from depths of up to 14 inches in heavily mineralized soil.  The pictures that I sent you (shown to the right) are of treasures that I found in Valkenisse, an Old Dutch village. All treasures are dated between the years of 1375 and 1500.

Once again, I really enjoy using the sovereign. Thank you for producing such a fantastic detector.

Sincerely,
John V


The Sovereign Pro has made coin-hunting an adventure again!
Fred P - Colorado, USA

I have used many kinds of detectors over the years. I used to think detectors featuring target ID were state-of-the-art. But after using a Minelab Sovereign Pro, I have realized I was wrong. This detector can be adjusted to flawlessly distinguish good targets from bad, even in heavily trashy areas. The key I found was to set the level of discrimination to the point where you get a broken audio response on screw caps and other objects you dig up which your preliminary settings fail to discriminate.

Even at higher levels of discrimination, the Sovereign Pro could clearly detect pennies and dimes at 9 inches down, even when surrounded by trash objects. I had never experienced this level of accuracy in trashy areas with other, single-frequency detectors before. Pinpointing was also accurate, fast and easy whenever the target was "x"ed in all-metals mode.  I averaged coin recovery at about one every 30 seconds in a park where trash had been such a problem that previously it had been hard to distinguish good targets from bad ones. It was almost like walking around and picking coins up off the ground! I was using the 10" (1000) coil during the test. With other detectors, I discovered that this size coil was usually too large to distinguish trash from treasure in heavily trashy areas. With the 17 frequencies of the Sovereign Pro, I had no problem accurately detecting and pinpointing good targets among undesirable ones, quickly and easily. The Sovereign Pro has made coin-hunting an adventure again, because of the high rate of good target recovery and minimal level of frustration due to false signals. The ability to mount the control box underneath the rear of the handle balances the heavier 1000 coil, and the heavy-duty construction enables the Sovereign Pro to stand up to heavy use.

Congratulations, Minelab, for a job well done!


Very Rare Civil War Store Card Found
Neal W., Indiana, USA

I was hunting a lot in an old part of town where a bulldozer had pushed some dirt around. The only old find that came from that dirt was this Civil War store card from a business in Kendallville, IN that goes by the name of W. and J. Bunyan. After I posted it on the Minelab forum I got a reply from D.B. in Maine telling me that he looked it up in his token guide and found that it has a rarity rating of R-7 which means there are only 20 or less of this particular one known to exist. I'm glad I decided to hunt that spot and also glad someone long ago planted it there for me to find and enjoy!
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White Gold and Diamonds on the Beach
Andy B., Florida, USA

While beach hunting on May 13th, I was working the wet sand with little success. After turning around and moving a little closer to the blanket line, I noticed a volleyball court and decided on a little detour from the grid. Nickels started popping up, and I'm fairly sure that someone had hit most of this area with high discrimination, thereby leaving all the lower conductivity stuff. That turned out to be just fine with me. :-)  Having only done a pass or two on the court, a guy asked if I could help find a set of car keys. He wasn't sure they'd been left on the beach, but if they were, they'd be in a pretty confined area. After scouring a 10x10 spot, he was sure someone else in the group took them, thanked me, and bolted. I headed right back to my volleyball court grid, and just beyond the border of the water side, I heard what I was pretty sure was a foil seal. But it turned out to be one of the lowest sounding rings I've ever found. When I saw the color, I had high hopes for platinum....but the white gold I ended up with will have to suffice. :-)
I suspect it's an older setting, and the diamonds tested out nicely.
 


Hunted Grounds Still Have Treasure
Chris C., Canada

The coin is a 1606 hammer struck douzain from the reign of Henry IV (August 2, 1589 - May 14, 1610). The Douzains were collected by the French Government in the late 1600s, repressed as a new coin, counter-stamped with the Fleur De Lis and sent for circulation in Canada, Louisiana and other New World colonies. This find was made with an Explorer XS and in an areas which was heavily hunted, but obviously worth the time it took to dig a handful of targets. It is my oldest coin find to date and I don't expect to see anything older without travel, but who knows. 1606 wasn't within reach until I found it.

 


A Mysterious Ring Found
Dave H., New York, USA

I was detecting in one of out locally hunted out parks when my Explorer II picked up a deep nickel-sounding target. The park had produced a number of century old coins over the years so my hopes were high that it was something good. After digging an 8" deep plug, I spotted a gold circle gleaming in the bottom of the hole. I picked it up and saw that it was a lady's gold signet ring engraved with the initials "MK". I judged from the style that it was probably made in the early 1900's. I imagine that "MK" has long sense passed away so it saddens me to know that I will never have the privilege of returning her ring. Perhaps, someday, I will solve the mystery of who she was.


Class Ring Found!
Neal W., Indiana, USA

My buddy Tim has been generous in letting me and others metal detect at a lake/resort site that he got permission to hunt. One of the best finds that I've dug on the beach there is this 1928 high school class ring. So far it's the oldest class ring I've found by about 30 years or so!

If anyone has an idea what high school this could come from I would really like to know. There is a chance the owner could still be alive and I would enjoy returning it (initials are inside the band).


Silver Watch Fob Found at 8" Next To An Old Can
Rob B., Michigan, USA

I found this silver watch fob at an old fair grounds/race track. The signal was iffy, but came in mostly as a high "coin" tone on my Explorer II. I was disappointed when I dug up a large squashed rusty can. I thought, "This isn't what I heard". Sure enough, a few inches over was that sweet high tone. I recovered this beauty at about 8 inches.

The Parlin & Orendorff Co. was in business from around 1850 to 1919 when International Harvester bought them out.

The maker of the fob was F.H. Noble and Co (tiny writing on the back). They have an interesting history of making love tokens that caused some trouble.
 


Last Hole of the Day
Robert H., Utah, USA

The ring shown above was found on November 4, 2004 using a Minelab Explorer with stock 10” coil. I had been hoping to find gold so I was making a point to dig all signals that hit in the nickel and pull tab range, knowing that gold rings often give similar signals. It was getting late and sunlight was fading when I got a perfect “pull tab” signal. I almost passed it up hoping to get a “good” signal before darkness set in. I took a step past then decided to stick with my original game plan to dig all pull tab signals. I pinpointed the signal and quickly dug the target. I knew immediately that this was no pull tab but because of the dirt and failing light I didn’t know just how nice of a find I had until I got it home.

The ring is 14k gold with 45 diamonds. The marquise stone is 1/3 c with 10 round cut stones and 34 baguettes totaling another 1.5 c. (total of just under 2c) The stones were tested by a jeweler and verified to all be diamonds. I did not pay for a complete appraisal ($45) so did not get a dollar value for the ring. However my wife enjoys wearing it.


My First Storecard
Ron F., Indiana, USA

I got a chance to get out and do some detecting the Tuesday before Thanksgiving With a friend Neal. We went to an old fairgrounds we had hunting and doing fairly well at. We hunted most of the day finding 17 injuns, A seated dime a shield nickel, some buttons. One of the last thing I dug that day was at first I thought was an injun, but after a closer look it had writing on it. Then I know it was my first CW storecard. After I got it home I cleaned it better and posted it. Not knowing were it was from was looking at towns all over Indiana. Then thought it was from Chicago. It was not until I post it for the contest that Mikey from Ohio sent me something on it, finding out that it was from New York City. That token sure did travel a long way in  1863 to get here. Thank you Ron

 

 


1908 Campaign Badge
Phil S., Illinois, USA

It sure made my day finding this presidential campaign badge. I've never found anything like it before. It was 8-9 inches deep, and I found it on Aug 28th 2004 with an original Explorer XS. I also found 3 Indian head pennies that day, but I would rather find something like this over common date Indian head pennies anytime. My two hunting partners using Explorer II's found barber dimes and Indian head pennies that day also. We all agreed that my campaign badge was more than likely the rarest find that day. It's a piece of history that I might not ever see unless I dig it up thanks to my Explorer XS.

 


Musket Hammer Found on an old Battlefield
Thomas F., New York, USA

In August/September of 1814, several violent clashes occurred between US Infantry and Artillery Regiments and the British, Canadian and their allied Native warriors. The siege of the American-held Fort Erie lasted several miserable months until the night of 15 August when a 02:00 am attack was mounted by British forces. One flanking attack was directed at a sandy mound called Snake Hill where Towson’s artillery commanded the field along the Lake Erie shore. The advancing forces were ordered to remove their flints from their muskets lest an accidental shot alert the pickets. They were decimated as they approached the redoubt.

19th September 2004, I got a sweet coin tone on my Explorer XS hard up against the low ferrous tone of an iron target. Down between some large rocks I dug a handful of dirt and out with it came a large rusty object. I began banging it against my shovel blade to remove the rust and crud from what I thought was an old door hinge but which looked oddly familiar. What a wonderful surprise as I recognized it for what it was! In my delight at finding this Musket ‘hammer’, I don’t even think I pursued the coin tone…. Just might have to go back and see what it was. If that coin tone hadn’t shone through the iron tone, I would never have recovered this artifact. Thank you Minelab for a quality product that never ceases to amaze.

 

 

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